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Inguinal Hernia Repair Surgery with Mesh
A hernia occurs when a tissue or organ pushes through a weakened area of muscle. A reducible, inguinal hernia occurs when the lump can be pushed into the area of the groin called the inguinal canal. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside and then repair the weak spot in the muscle. A piece of mesh or other prosthesis is placed to prevent the hernia from reappearing.
Laparoscopic Repair of Recurrent, Inguinal Hernia
A recurrent inguinal hernia occurs when the bulging organ (hernia) reappears near or at the location of a previous repair. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back into the area of the groin called the inguinal canal. The surgeon will laparoscopically repair the whole in your inguinal canall so the hernia cannot come through again.
Repair Incisional or Ventral Hernia with Mesh
A reducible, incisional or ventral hernia occurs when the bulging organ protrudes outside of the abdominal wall. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside the abdominal cavity and repair the hole in your abdominal wall with mesh or other prosthesis so the hernia cannot come through again.
Repair of An Umbilical Hernia Via An Open Approach
A umbilical hernia occurs when the bulging organ protrudes outside of the abdominal wall near the naval area (belly button). The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside the abdominal cavity and repair the hole in your abdominal wall so the hernia cannot come through again.
Repair of Incarcerated or Strangulated Umbilical Hernia
A strangulated or incarcerated, umbilical hernia occurs when the hernia contents are restricted enough where there is reduced or no blood flow to that part of the body. Seek immediate care if a hernia bulge turns red, purple or dark or if you notice any other signs or symptoms of a strangulated hernia. Surgery may be immediately necessary. It is a process where the surgeon will first release the trapped tissue and navigate back into the umbilical or naval cavity, then remove any damaged tissue if needed.
Repair of Incarcerated or Strangulated, Spigelian or Epigast
An incarcerate or strangulated, epigastric or spigelian hernia is when a piece of fat bulges through a weakened part of abdominal wall muscle wall supposed to hold it in place and cuts off blood supply to vital organs in the area. The opening is near the center of the abdomen (belly), between the bottom of the breastbone (sternum) and the belly button. The surgeon will either remove this portion of fat, or push the sac back into your abdominal cavity, and place a mesh over the site of the hernia to prevent reappearance. Seek immediate care if a hernia bulge turns red, purple or dark or if you notice any other signs or symptoms of a strangulated hernia.
Repair of Initial Reducible Incisional or Ventral Hernia
A reducible, incisional or ventral hernia occurs when the bulging organ protrudes outside of the abdominal wall. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside the abdominal cavity and repair the hole in your abdominal wall so the hernia cannot come through again.
Repair of Initial Reducible, Inguinal Hernia
A hernia occurs when a tissue or organ pushes through a weakened area of muscle. A reducible, inguinal hernia occurs when the lump can be pushed into the area of the groin called the inguinal canal. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside and then repair the weak spot in the muscle.
Repair of Initial Strangulated or Incarcerated Inguinal Her
A strangulated or incarcerated, inguinal hernia occurs when the hernia contents are restricted enough where there is reduced or no blood flow to that part of the body. Seek immediate care if a hernia bulge turns red, purple or dark or if you notice any other signs or symptoms of a strangulated hernia. Surgery may be immediately necessary. It is a process where the surgeon will first release the trapped tissue and navigate back into the inguinal cavity, then remove any damaged tissue if needed.
Repair of Initial Strangulated, Incisional or Ventral Hernia
A strangulated or incarcerated, ventral or incisional hernia occurs when the hernia contents are restricted enough where there is reduced or no blood flow to that part of the body. Seek immediate care if a hernia bulge turns red, purple or dark or if you notice any other signs or symptoms of a strangulated hernia. Surgery may be immediately necessary. It is a process where the surgeon will first release the trapped tissue and navigate back into the abdominal cavity, then remove any damaged tissue if needed.
Repair of Reducible, Recurrent Incisional or Ventral Hernia
A reducible, recurrent incisional or ventral hernia occurs when the bulging organ (hernia) reappears near or at the location of a previous repair. The surgeon will first place the bulging organs or tissues back inside the abdominal cavity and repair the whole in your abdominal wall so the hernia cannot come through again.
Repair of Reducible, Spigelian or Epigastric Hernia
A reducible, epigastric hernia is when a piece of fat bulges through a weakened part of abdominal wall muscle wall supposed to hold it in place. The opening is near the center of the abdomen (belly), between the bottom of the breastbone (sternum) and the belly button. The surgeon will either remove this portion of fat, or push the sac back into your abdominal cavity, and place a mesh over the site of the hernia to prevent reappearance.